Install this theme

Val Jeanty

after lampedusa, we are once again, in the wake. thank you, christina sharpe, for the term which alerts me to our always again after-the-fact-ness of witnessing black death, unnamed dying, waking to it and holding a wake, if only one could.
in the wake, sabine broeck
Some problems we share as women, some we do not. You [white women] fear your children will grow up to join the patriarchy and testify against you; we fear our children will be dragged from a car and shot down in the street, and you will turn your backs on the reasons they are dying.
Audre Lorde, “Age, Race, Class, and Sex: Women Redefining Difference” (via sundayafternoonsocialclub)
The “real” world itself is a product of the imagination, a construct through which we make meaning. Such meaning, as Rushdie reminds us in “Imaginary Homelands,” is “a shaky edifice we build out of scraps, dogmas, childhood injuries, newspapers, articles, chance remarks, old films, small victories, people hated, people loved.”

kickmag:

The Black Constellation-Ode To Octavia Part 12: Sparkles…Recollections Of The Wraith 

The Black Constellation consists of Shabazz Palaces, THEESatisfaction and artist/director Maikoiyo Alley-Barnes. “SparklesRecollections Of The Wraith” is Part 12 of an installation dedicated to science fiction writer Octavia Butler. The visuals are luxurious in color and combine an earthly and ethereal reality awareness much like Butler’s sci-fi narratives.

Did you ever stare at the moon, ‘til you saw double?

Black Panthers - Agnès Varda 1968 (by togolais75)

I was born with the feeling that if time and hurry were forgotten, something quiet and wonderful would happen in their place.
Eudora Welty, Tell About Night Flowers
whos-afraid-of-postblack-art:

“My often times anthropomorphic sculpture explores tropes of the black body as well as tropes of objects called ethnographic. [My art] dramatically locates the black body as site for both the creation of culture and transformation, as subject and object in simultaneity.”
Simone Leigh
Overburdened with Significance
2010-11
mixed media ceramic sculpture

whos-afraid-of-postblack-art:

“My often times anthropomorphic sculpture explores tropes of the black body as well as tropes of objects called ethnographic. [My art] dramatically locates the black body as site for both the creation of culture and transformation, as subject and object in simultaneity.”

Simone Leigh

Overburdened with Significance

2010-11

mixed media ceramic sculpture

Did you have a genius of a great-great-grandmother who died under some ignorant and depraved white overseer’s lash? Or was she required to bake biscuits for a lazy backwater tramp, when she cried out in her soul to paint watercolors of sunsets, or the rain falling on the green and peaceful pasturelands? Or was her body broken and forced to bear children (who were more often than not sold away from her)-eight, ten, fifteen, twenty children-when her one joy was the thought of modeling heroic figures of Rebellion, in stone or clay?

How was the creativity of the Black woman kept alive, year after year and century after century, when for most of the years Black people have been in America, it was a punishable crime for a Black person to read or write? And the freedom to paint, to sculpt, to expand the mind with action did not exist. Consider, if you can bear to imagine it, what might have been the result if singing, too, had been forbidden by law. Listen to the voices of Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, Nina Simone, Roberta Flack, and Aretha Franklin, among others, and imagine those voices muzzled for life. Then you may begin to comprehend the lives of our “crazy,” “Sainted” mothers and grandmothers. The agony of the lives of women who might have been Poets, Novelists, Essayists, and Short Story Writers, who died with their real gifts stifled within them.

dyingisawildnight:

Esperanza Spaulding covers “Tell him”

drum-taps:

Sun Ra and His Arkestra—“Intergalactic Motion”

Outer Spaceways Incorporated (Black Lion 1968).

THE DOOR BY AVA DuVERNAY (by miumiu)

Self-reflection in conversation requires trust. It’s hard to do anything with 3,000 Facebook friends except connect.
bonappetit:

One Dough Six Ways: Our Master Sweet Bread dough rises to any occasion
(Photographs by Matt Duckor, animation by Erik S. Peterson)

bonappetit:

One Dough Six Ways: Our Master Sweet Bread dough rises to any occasion

(Photographs by Matt Duckor, animation by Erik S. Peterson)